Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Juravieal

WoW Performance Issues/Tweaks, Etc

874 posts in this topic

If you are doing the run's /combatlog, then I would suggest turning off antivirus file access scanning of *.txt files, for one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A quick question on all this combat log talk, as its not something I had heard/thought of before. I current run the /combatlog for our WWS reports. Possibly this is adversely affecting things? If I were to filter the log as suggested above, would the above logging switch still work for WWS purposes?

The /combatlog is an entirely seperate process that's independent of anything you do in WoW. Filtering your log will not interfere with the process. There's really nothing you could do to effect /combatlog in general, and is actually one of the points I failed to mention above which further supports a server->client(s) transmission and then a separate process paradigm.

/Combatlog itself is a somewhat performing task as well, as I believe it writes to the file in chunks, but I'm unaware of when the chunks get dumped to the text file. Thus, there's probably a memory component (but who cares about memory), but more importantly: a periodic disk access component. I'm unaware of the intricacies however, and tend to only see a single digit FPS loss when I run /combatlog with my usually fragmented 7200 RPM drives, and that's only in 25-mans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suspect at the very least, that there's an inherent "peek" operation going on in most mods to at least check the event type (which happens to be the first flag on each combat line as far as I know) and that in itself is likely an intense operation to keep things running at real-time. I doubt there's an underlying engine that "peeks" once and doles out the lines of combat to applicable mods

I could be wrong here as I don't claim to be a LUA expert - Since WoW is event driven, that should pretty much be exactly what's going on under the hood. Functions in addons are registering for notification when events arrive at the client, and then the event parser within the client is notifying everyone that hooked into a particular event. If you have addons that are hooking into tons of shit that they don't need, or that are hooking into events that fire frequently (BAG_SLOT_UPDATED used to fire stupidly often as I recall, which made bag sorting addons perform horribly), then the addons will require additional CPU time to run their event callbacks.

[e] In case I misunderstood what you were saying - the addons themselves shouldn't be inspecting every single event. Rather they register with the client, which keeps track of which callbacks are interested in what event types. When the client reads that event type at arrival, it runs through the list of interested listeners and instructs them to execute their callbacks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I mis-used my lingo and goofed in interpretation. The callbacks are what I was referring to.

If you have addons that are hooking into tons of shit that they don't need, or that are hooking into events that fire frequently (BAG_SLOT_UPDATED used to fire stupidly often as I recall, which made bag sorting addons perform horribly), then the addons will require additional CPU time to run their event callbacks.

This is my concern these days. I wish someone would create a comprehensive profiler at this point, beyond the generic "cpu processor tracker" that's floating around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ffor me if I have Firefox running (in fullscreen in game) and I am in a raid (ONLY raids...normal world is fine), I get very bad fps and then d/c issues. Some thought it might be many tabs open, but all I had open was EJ or Wowhead. WoW, Firefox and Ventrillo are the only things I ever run on the system. I found closing Firefox helped tremendously. I wouldn't post as I assume most close just about everything running on their system, but a browser is such a common tool these days that I felt it could be overlooked.

Now, as for why the two behave so poorly together for me, I've got no idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, I mis-used my lingo and goofed in interpretation. The callbacks are what I was referring to.

This is my concern these days. I wish someone would create a comprehensive profiler at this point, beyond the generic "cpu processor tracker" that's floating around.

Of course even if you knew how many hooks were being made by a particular addon you'd then also need to know some information about how often in a given space of time were those events firing on average. At some point you just have to hope that the addon developer knows what he's doing, but it definitely does give weight to getting rid of anything that you don't absolutely need if you aren't positive that its been coded in an efficient manner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ffor me if I have Firefox running (in fullscreen in game) and I am in a raid (ONLY raids...normal world is fine), I get very bad fps and then d/c issues. Some thought it might be many tabs open, but all I had open was EJ or Wowhead. WoW, Firefox and Ventrillo are the only things I ever run on the system. I found closing Firefox helped tremendously. I wouldn't post as I assume most close just about everything running on their system, but a browser is such a common tool these days that I felt it could be overlooked.

Now, as for why the two behave so poorly together for me, I've got no idea.

Firefox -- and yes, I'm a user -- is a gigantic memory and CPU performance hog, especially as more tabs are opened. In many ways, it's a terrific browser, but memory/CPU performance is not one of them. In fact, I find that when I'm having WoW issues, I can close any browser I'm running (Safari on Mac, IE on Windows) and generally gain a meaningful boost to WoW performance. Your mileage may vary, but it's a good fix to at least try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's probably an academic question, but I wonder how much of that is inherent to the browser and how much of it depends on the site. As was mentioned before, flash player is a rather intensive process, and I know I've seen particular flash-ads that are way worse than normal to my system, even without functionality past animation (mostly mom&pop ads on freeforms.org). Of course, with the proliferation of cheap memory and broadband most sites have this so if your browser is open at all it probably has two ads and a dozen buttons per tab.

Software in general seems to be designed under the paradigm that if a program is open at all, it's the most important program the system is running, which is true for less than 10% of what I'm running at any given time. You might want to look into minimalistic replacements for side-processes like music.

I think some plugins also get initialized on first use after a reboot. For example, adobe's .pdf viewer tends to have a start-up process the first time I use it, but not on later uses. Does that mean it leaves something around taking up resources?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im currently running WoW on a fairly new laptop with 3gig RAM, GeForce 8400M 512MB.

I have most graphics on minimal and raid instances have an average fps of 10.

Yesterday we had a 40 man raid to kill the Alliance leaders and when we got to IF i got disconnected due to lagging and when i got back online my fps dropped to 2. I turned off recount and questhelper. Then we went to SW and i saw my fps remaining at the normal 10 fps.

So i can conclude that questhelper while in raids gives lag and fps drops because to communicates with other members in the raid that also have questhelper.

Recount just processes too much data imo, and thus adding more to the already massive calculations WoW sends us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of people blame Firefox for bad performance, but in my experience it's not really the browser's fault. First of all Flash is a big offender and you really ought to browse with Flashblock + NoScript installed if you like your fps high in WoW (and for security reasons, but that's another matter entirely). For me I lose 10-15 fps if I have even the smallest Flash object loaded in any tab in Firefox/Seamonkey. Regardless of whether that tab has focus or not. In addition to that, NoScript helps with those pages with horribly written JavaScript (and trust me... there's a lot). For the longest time on my laptop WoWhead's talent calculator pages would eat up 20% CPU just sitting there doing nothing for example (I think they have fixed that now though).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was experiencing similarly awful performance during raids to many of those who have posted here, seeing drops to ~10 FPS during 25 man encounters such as Sartharion +3.

Whilst my hardware is by no means bleeding edge, it's more than sufficient to run a non graphically intensive game such as WoW. Below is a list of tweaks I made to arrive at the more satisfactory result of 45-50 FPS during 25 man Sarth +3.

Raid with the lowest in game settings you can stand. Personally, I raid with all of the video sliders set to minimum except for Spell Detail, which I have on max (due to a bad experience with not being able to see Grobbulus clouds). Setting Sound Channels to minimum can also provide some benefit.

Prune your addons and saved variables. After myself and other guildies had experienced repeated disconnection issues on Four Horsemen (anecdotally caused by Thane's meteor cast) I disabled Omen and Recount, the two biggest memory users in my UI, and solved this particular issue. Post raid I disabled and deleted a load of mods that were just unnecessary for raiding, and cleaned up their associated saved variables. You can do this either with the old WowAceUpdater (File menu > Cleanup WoW Saved Variables) or manually by browsing your WTF folder and removing .lua files associated with mods you no longer use.

Maintain updated hardware drivers. This has already been mentioned several times in this thread, so I won't go into detail. As with any software bug fixes and improvements are released regularly, so it's important to stay up to date.

Close non essential programs while raiding. Again, this has been covered repeatedly, but it's worth mentioning again briefly. Web browsers, Instant Messaging clients, and audio players can all use resources that would otherwise be spent keeping your WoW FPS up.

Disable unnecessary Vista services. If you're a Vista user, you should be aware that there are an incredible amount of unnecessary services being loaded and executed that you can disable for more in-game performance. Many sites offer good tweaking guides; one of the easiest to follow can be found here - Part 1 and here - Part 2

Overclock your CPU. This isn't for everyone, but it's worth noting that your CPU's clock speed is arguably the biggest limiting factor for WoW performance. Many of the current generation of Intel CPU's can easily reach higher than stock clock speeds, so it's definitely worth researching and spending some time testing out different hardware settings. As an example, I was able to overclock my E8400 CPU from 3ghz to 3.6ghz, which is a 20% increase, without purchasing any additional hardware. There are many online guides as to how to do this, but it's probably beyond the scope of this thread to go into too much detail. A good place to start for E8400 owners is here - Legion Hardware.

Tighten your RAM timings. Like the previous point, this falls into the semi-advanced category as it involves changing hardware settings. Many motherboards use slower than necessary settings for your RAM by default, which obviously has a negative impact on performance. Download CPU-Z, which is an excellent tool for examining your hardware configuration, and make a note of the numbers on the Memory tab. This is the speed at which your memory is currently running. Then, click on the SPD tab - this reads your memory's possible settings that the manufacturer has saved to the ROM on your sticks. You might find that an EPP (Enhanced Performance Profile) has been included, which represents a high performance configuration for your memory.

I've been deliberately vague with the last two points, as it's not something I'd encourage everyone to try. However, for those who are willing to spend the time reading hardware sites and forums, and testing their system over and over again, it can provide a nice performance boost for little to no cost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a tip for Vista users experiencing poor game performance that should always be tried before digging through mods and worrying about hardware:

Disable SuperFetch.

SuperFetch makes programs load faster by guessing what you're going to load next and putting it into memory ahead of time. While you're playing WoW, you aren't going to load any new programs, but SuperFetch finds a way to eat up tons of resources, lagging the game down.

I was experiencing FPS that dropped suddenly down from >30 to 1-2, lasting exactly 60 seconds, then recovering back to high FPS. During this time, vent would lag and stutter, and sometimes I got disconnected (probably because the game was crawling so badly it couldn't keep up with net traffic). I disabled SuperFetch and it was fixed immediately.

If those symptoms sound familiar, and even if they don't, give disabling SuperFetch a try. It's quick and easily reversible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This seems related - WoW has been disconnecting me on 25-man fights with lots of AOE, i.e. it used to do this in Hyjal on the trash waves, and does so in Noth (why?) and 4 Horsemen. Even with addons turned off and the WDB folder, I'll still get disconnected while these fights are in progress. As best as I can tell, this is due to a paltry 192kbps up/down SDSL line.

I'll be upgrading to an ADSL line soon but for the interim, has anyone found a way to minimize or eliminate these issues? It looks like it's just sending so much data that the client can't keep up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This seems related - WoW has been disconnecting me on 25-man fights with lots of AOE, i.e. it used to do this in Hyjal on the trash waves, and does so in Noth (why?) and 4 Horsemen. Even with addons turned off and the WDB folder, I'll still get disconnected while these fights are in progress. As best as I can tell, this is due to a paltry 192kbps up/down SDSL line.

I'll be upgrading to an ADSL line soon but for the interim, has anyone found a way to minimize or eliminate these issues? It looks like it's just sending so much data that the client can't keep up.

I'm on fiber optic (FIOS) in the LA area, very close to Blizzard. I have the same lag issue, especially when there is any sort of server side lag. OS+2 was completely impossible as half the raid lagged for 15s while aoeing down the drakes. OS+1 was barely possible due to shield wall. A week earlier we did not have the problem.

Things I have heard that might cause it

Morbidity talent + DnD with lots of targets- We have 4 dks and they were using death and decay to kill the drakes

Recount - Running this, but some who dont have the lag issue were also running recount

Computer speed/memory - No confirmation on this

Conjecture:

Some sort of buggy programming on the Morbidity talent is causing extra processing for every death knight dot tick on every mob. When the server is not lagging (no queue), this does not cause a problem. When it is lagging, some players get very bursty combat log updates. These updates can cause problems depending on number of addons loaded and cause problems with various addons (especially recount).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The morbidity bug should only affect DKs though, and not even all of them. In my guild I think I'm the only DK who lags from specing into morbidity(I'm the only one who AE tanks often though), and I usually don't use it on Sarth, but I've never heard anyone complain about lagging specifically when I was during naxx trash clearing and stuff like that(when I usually freeze for seconds). However we have had a few people chain disconnecting in raids and stuff. Turning "off" combat log didn't seem to fix it for them either, I think it might be more computer/router/ISP specific than actually wow specific.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is not so much a performance issue in the software but there is still an ongoing ISP issue for many Comcast users. Blizz is collecting "tracert"s from people but has yet to figure out a solution/cause for the problem.

If you're experiencing performance problems and you have Comcast this may be part of the problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disable SuperFetch.

In the event that Windows Vista is approaching maximum memory usage it will assume that cached memory is the same as unused memory, for this reason you will see very little (if any at all) performance decrease from SuperFetch in minimal available memory scenarios.

However, in the event that you have more RAM than WoW + OS can use, Superfetch will cache useful data that you will probably need in the future. Although Microsoft hasn't divulged too much in depth technical detail about Superfetch I believe it can also cache memory outside of a processes' maximum addressable range. This means that even though WoW as a 32-bit process can only address 2GB of RAM (under Windows) Superfetch will cache additional data to memory separate from the 32-bit limit, thus increasing performance in situations where you are pushing the 2GB limit. On my core i7 pushed to 4.1ghz + 4870x2 @ 800mhz core and 1000mhz memory you can feel the addressable memory limit easily when you push all settings to max, turning around results in a large fps drop for a small period of time while new data loads to memory, this is mitigated but not eliminated by turning on SuperFetch.

One solution which I am surprised Blizzard has not yet implemented is setting IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE in the image header of Wow.exe. What this does is increase the maximum addressable memory of WoW to 4GB, since the actual 32-bit limit is 2^32 = 4294967296 bits = 4GB. The 2GB limit is just imposed by windows in order to reserve some memory for the OS. It should be noted that in XP you must also set /3g in your boot.ini in order to take advantage of this, and you will only get around 3-3.1GB max for a single process, as the OS actually DOES need some portion of that 4GB. The painful part about this would-be amazing performance increase is that it would require manually recompiling your wow.exe, which while easily doable is against the ToS and will be immediately detectable by Blizzard due to the different MD5 checksum your WoW.exe will have, thus not even allowing you to get past the log in screen.

I made a thread about LargeAddressAware in the technical forums but haven't gotten a response yet, maybe someone can help out, I can't really bump it at the right time since Datth is at work the same time I am. Technical Forums

Suggestion Forums

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From my experience, it's primarily DK spells that appear to cause graphics lag. Death and Decay has always been fine for me, my a single path of frost can drop my 80FPS down to 7FPS. I'm willing to bet this is primarily due to lack of optimisation in the new spell effects. Hopefully, in upcoming patches, stuff like this will be optimised. As it is, I feel like screaming at anyone who uses path of frost in BGs, no matter how useful, because of how frustrating and silly it is to be dropped down to 7 FPS because of some silly ice.

As a note, Death and Decay, even talented, has never caused me any problems, but I'm using a Mac. Macbook Pro 17" with a GeForce 8600 and 4GBs of ram. Perhaps they have the DnD optimisations in the Mac version. Path of Frost, on the other hand, makes me want to kick a puppy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you enabled hiding of lua errors in the interface options? If you have, you can try disabling it and if you get error messages disable the addon that produces them (or look for a fixed version).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On rare occasions, particularly after having the client up for several hours, it stops rendering the ground completely. I get shrubs, trees, and other doodads, but no ground, and the FPS also drops to about 1.0. A restart of the client reliably fixes this. I was also able to fix it by setting shadow rendering to one less than maximum. (I normally play with max graphics settings minus full-screen glow and I think anti-aliasing.) My computer is a Dell, running Vista, ATI Radeon something, less than a year old, WoW in windowed mode. Apologies for the incomplete information, but maybe that will help some people if they have this particular problem.

Meanwhile, I seem to be getting FPS issues not yet mentioned in this thread. Namely, FPS for me drops considerably when I look in certain directions. I've noticed this when looking toward Naxxramas from the Wintergarde graveyard, as well as in selected locations in Icecrown and Zul'Drak. FPS goes from about 30 to about 1-2. I've fixed this problem easily enough by simply "not moving my arm like that", but I'd be interested in knowing if anyone else has experienced this.

(And of course, Dalaran poses similar problems, but my only hope there is probably to pay everyone to transfer off Gilneas.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have noticed around 5-10 fps increase on latest beta build of Windows 7 - build 7000.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oldie but goodie: Start windows media player before starting Wow!

Yesterday I did multiple things mentioned in this thread, and stuff seemed faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm having similar issues with low fps in WoW. I get about 20 fps in Dalaran with all settings set to minimum. I've got 2GB PC6400, E6600 Core 2 Duo and a 8800GTX running @ 1920x1200 (fps doesn't improve if I resize the window to smaller proportions). Shouldn't that kind of setup perform better than 20 fps?

I've heard that memory issues can have a pretty negative impact on fps, and when I ran 'Windows Memory Diagnostic Tool' it did indeed find some problems. Can't afford to replace the RAM at the moment, so I can't say for sure if that's my problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That being said, the "effects" tab of your video options can remove most of them (probably not all). The biggest culprit is the new shadow quality setting. Changing this from highest to lowest will double the fps of most computers.

I can vouch for this. My FPS still isn't amazing, but I was having utterly dismal frame rates before I made this change. Changing any other settings made virtually no difference atall (including changing view distance from maximum to minimum. I think Blizzard have some significant problems with their shadow rendering. Anything other than the minimum setting destroys my fps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been noticing the media player improvement too, basically when opening Media Player, I notice a 10 fps increase, I am however unsure if this improvement is permanent however, it seems to me that the fps drops towards it's normal value after some time. Anybody else noticed this, and potentially did some research on it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.