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Restoration Glyphs


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#301 malthrin

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 03:40 PM

On what boss do you actually anticipate doing that?

#302 VASHFONTANE

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 04:30 PM

I have been experimenting with the glyph of nourish. I have been using castsequence macros to see how many nourishs i can get max benefit from this glyph. So far my spell rotation looks like
Regrowth, Rejuvenation, Lifebloom, Wild Growth, Nourish, Nourish, Nourish, Swiftmend, Wild Growth, Lifebloom, Nourish, Nourish

My goal is to spam as many nourish as i can while Regrowth, Rejuvenation, Lifebloom, and Wild Growth are ticking. so far this is the rotation i have does anybody have any better rotations or suggestions?



As far as i knew there was no set rotation for druid healing. Even if you were main tank healing, which you should not be, there is still no set rotation.

#303 Titanstrider

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 05:28 PM

If the cast sequence macro is "to the side" for testing for fun, you might be able to come up with something that utilizes Nourish, but really such macros are terrible these days. Your use of Nourish really depends on your group makeup. It's handy when you are the only healer in 5 mans or to assist tank healing 10 mans with 1 other healer. There you should have 2-3 HoTs on the tank or someone who takes a spike of damage, and Nourish is a fast way to bring a person back up.

With the change to Innervate coming up, the glyph will be a bit more useful than before, and in a raid situation will likely be more beneficial than the Nourish glyph. Nourish will get its own HPS boost via talent, and if also glyphed will be rather nice when you are the primary healer. If you have no use for the extra mana, then Nourish would be the way to go. Just don't try to use a cast sequence to heal. You might have a routine you use when a tank is pulling a boss, but after those first couple casts you have to be flexible.

#304 Erdluf

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 06:20 PM

I agree that there isn't much point to the cast sequence macro. I do think it is interesting to look at our maximum sustained single target HPS, for comparison purposes if nothing else.

I believe in 3.1 the maximum single target HPS is

3-hots + NS+HT + swiftmend + nourish

You'd use glyphs of nourish, regrowth, and swiftmend. Lifebloom should be slow-stacked. At very low gear levels (buffed SP at around 2k), Swiftmend should be dropped (Nourish+3 hots is better). I'm not sure if adding Lb glyph helps at that point, but it probably does.

In 3.2 I think it changes so that you would use rolling lifebloom, and Nourish(3 hots, ET, etc.) is better than Swiftmend until something like 3300-3400 SP.

#305 Rijndael

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 11:42 PM

This is my take on the glyphs a main spec restoration druid might consider using. I will consider the following glyphs: healing touch, innervate, lifebloom, nourish, rapid rejuvenation, rebirth, regrowth, rejuvenation, swiftmend, and wild growth. There is no best set of glyphs for all situations -- glyphs are meant to see situational use depending on the mechanics of the fight.

Special thanks to Arentios for writing the initial glyph guide and starting the discussion -- much of this information is from his post here.

Healing Touch.

With the Empowered Touch talent now affecting both Nourish and Healing Touch, on top of the multiple Nourish-boosting talents, Nourish really does have much better average case performance than glyphed Healing Touch (gHT). The advantages of gHT is that it can cast very quickly (0.7 second cast time with 0.5 second under heroism is not difficult to achieve), and has better worst case performance than Nourish (e.g. it heals for more than a non-crit Nourish on a target that's hot-less). The reason has to do with a slightly odd way spellpower coefficients interact with the glyph of healing touch (the precise formula can be found here).

Speed and worst case performance are situationally useful -- many druids use glyphed healing touch for healing penetrating cold on heroic Anub 25, for instance. Furthermore, gHT is fast enough that it can be used to heal tanks and heavy damage recipients reactively, minimizing overheal. Unfortunately, getting glyphed healing touch generally means taking 5 points in naturalist, which means you end up with this basic spec.

You must then choose whether you want to give up CF (lowers haste), nature's grace/living seed (lowers the value of crit), subtlety (raises your aggro which is important on some fights like Anub), or living spirit (lowers mana regen and throughput somewhat).

You also lose nature swiftness + healing touch combo.

The consensus among resto druids seems to be that healing touch is a situational glyph, used only in situations where direct heal sniping is important enough to justify the sacrifices the glyph entails.

Innervate.

Grants the druid 20% of the mana innervate grants whenever the druid uses innervate on any target. Currently resto druids are limited by GCD and throughput, not by mana. Thus, the consensus in the resto druid community has been to concentrate on glyphs that improve throughput not glyphs that improve longevity. Possible mana-stressing fights in Icecrown may change this consensus.

Lifebloom.

Adds 1 second duration to lifebloom. The value of this glyph depends heavily on the "rotation" used, or more precisely on the proportion of spells used in a given fight. Many druids healing raid damage on fights like Twin Valkyrs use Rejuvenation, and Wild Growth exclusively with an occasional Swiftmend. In such situations this glyph has no use.

However many fights are less well suited to a pro-active hot blanketing raid healing strategy druids use, some fights like Festergut alternate between heavy raid damage and heavy tank damage phases, and yet other fights feature heavy tank damage which make druid hot rolling on tanks an important contributor to tank stability, even if this involves losing some raid healing throughput on the part of the druid. In such situations, the lifebloom glyph is useful in proportion to the amount of lifeblooms cast.

In particular, if the majority of GCDs are spent on lifebloom, then the glyph adds about 10% to throughput. If the majority of the GCDs are spent on spells other than lifebloom, with a lifebloom stack or two maintained then the glyph adds 10% more lifeblooms cast per unit time, which translates to creating extra GCDs equal to 10% of the amount of GCDs used on lifebloom. If we assume for simplicity that a druid uses an 20 second rotation with 3 wild growth casts, 1 lifebloom stack, and rejuvs for the rest of the GCDs, then at haste capped 1 second GCD, the druid casts lifebloom a little over 2 times per rotation, which means the GCD gain from the glyph is 10% of (2+epsilon)/20 which is a little in excess of 1% throughput.

The glyph doesn't save mana per se, since any time gained by casting less lifeblooms will be used to cast other spells.

Since in the vast majority of fights resto druids don't spend most of their GCDs on lifebloom, the HPS gain is generally too small for wide use of this glyph.

Nourish.

Best tank healing glyph for resto druids, this turns Nourish into an HPS monster on any target with full hots. Most raiding guilds use paladins for healing tanks due to the power of Beacon of Light, with druid tank healing restricted to rolling hots for stability. Nevertheless, this glyph is powerful enough where some druids run with it for the strategic value of being able to shift to tank healing in the middle of a fight. Some fights in Icecrown such as Festergut or Putricide create tank pressure in some phases, which may give druids a reason to run this glyph for those fights. This glyph is also useful for new druids with poor gear healing 5 mans, since their hots alone will be insufficient for keeping up tanks, and for even well-geared druids in 10 man raids where any healer can be called upon to help with any healing role.

Rapid Rejuvenation.

The new glyph of patch 3.3, this makes haste rating lower the time between rejuvenation ticks (without adding new ticks). This leaves healing per cast time of rejuvenation unchanged while increasing healing per second. This glyph is similar to the priest glyph of renew in this way. The value of this glyph depends on the damage pattern of the fight. Some fights, such as Twin Valkyrs, have raid wide aura damage which favors Rejuv/Wild Growth spamming. In such fights, what determines druid throughput is healing per cast time, which makes this glyph not particularly useful. On the other hand, some fights feature damage that is more focused on tanks, and specific targets (for instance Rotface's infection, or Saurfang's mark). In such fights druids don't spam as much, and use more targetted healing instead, so healing per second becomes a more important characteristic. In such fights the glyph may be very valuable. Finally on some fights (Anub) you may want to restrict the amount of HPS you do. Such fights also aren't a good time to bring out this glyph. The glyph becomes very powerful in 5 man or 10 man content since it allows druids to blanket the entire group/raid with faster ticking Rejuvenations with little sacrifice of coverage.

Rebirth.

A situational glyph, it brings a measure of raid stability (since a dead target wil come back at full health) at the expense of throughput you give up by not slotting a throughput glyph. May be a handy glyph for the few fights where deaths are planned for and raid damage is spiky (Iron Council hard in Ulduar for instance).

Regrowth.

Adds 20% to any regrowth which was recast on a target already affected by Regrowth. Currently Regrowth rarely accounts for more than 10% of resto druid healing, which would put the gains from this glyph at 2% at best (and likely quite a bit less). With the new version of the Gift of the Earth Mother talent, and the increased emphasis on haste, Regrowth with its many supporting talents and a long hot may well become a mainstay raid healing spell for some druids. If Regrowth becomes competitive with Rejuv, this glyph would become mandatory for Regrowth users.

I should say that one disadvantage of a Regrowth-heavy healing strategy is lessening the value of Revitalize, which procs off Rejuvenation. Revitalize is a very powerful mana regeneration and dps boosting talent for the raid.

Rejuvenation.

Adds a tick valued at 50% of a normal Rejuv tick to a target which was at less than 50% HP at the time Rejuv ticked. The small tick appears with a small time lag, and (as of last testing) only if the normal tick does not bring the target over the 50% HP mark. Empirically, the gains from this glyph are very modest, rarely exceeding 2%. Ticking aura fights where many raid members are expected to reach low health are ideal times to use this glyph. This glyph interacts well with the glyph of Rapid Rejuvenation in fights with burst damage on a few telegraphed targets. Both glyphs add HPS to Rejuvenation ticking on a target of burst damage. Rapid Rejuvenation glyph makes the ticks faster (more likely to save the target of burst), and Rejuvenation glyph makes the tick bigger (bigger tick -- less probability of death).

Swiftmend.

Prevents Swiftmend from eating a hot when it's cast. This glyph is similar to the lifebloom glyph in the sense that it saves you GCDs since you have to recast less hots. The value of this glyph isn't straightforward to compute -- it essentially saves you whatever healing the remaining hot would have done had it not been eaten by Swiftmend. If hots are eaten with half their duration on average, and if Swiftmend heals for (approximately) the full healing value of a hot, then a rough approximation to the value of this glyph is about a third to a half of healing Swiftmend did for the encounter (assuming Swiftmend and the hots both have approximately similar overheal). This glyph is also very helpful for tank healing druids as it eases the GCD lock burden tank healing druids have (since they have to recast hots on the tank and simultaneously quickly react to burst events on the tank).

Wild Growth.

Effectively adds 20% (by adding a 6th target) to a spell many druids use on cooldown. Wild Growth tends to account for 15-25% of healing done for many druids on most fights. This glyph is thus a solid choice, and widely used. It is especially useful on situations where druids find themselves spamming Rejuvenations with Wild Growth on cooldown (the so called 5+1 rotation). This glyph may be less useful in situations where the raid is spread out to the extent that Wild Growth is unlikely to hit its target maximum.

#306 Insertname

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 08:20 PM

I have not seen much discussion of the effectivity of the Wild Growth glyph in 10-man raids vs. 25-man raids.
I heal primarily 10-man raids and I rarely get WG to hit 5 targets. Maybe it's just bad positioning on my part,
but it just seems more difficult to get the full WG benefit with only 10 raiders. As a consequence, the glyph does not
seem that helpful. I have tried a macro to target the boss before casting, but it does not seem to make a substantial difference. Am I just doing it wrong or is WG really much less effective in 10-mans?

#307 Eanelen

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 12:02 AM

I tend to use myself as a focus of WG. I'm constantly moving around in a fight, and if melee eats a PBAoE, I'll target one of the central dpsers, if damage is more varied, between ranged and melee, I'll run to a spot about halfway between the two and target myself so that I get the most wounded between the two. Seems to work well for placement.

#308 Mjoedgaard

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 12:04 AM

I have not seen much discussion of the effectivity of the Wild Growth glyph in 10-man raids vs. 25-man raids.
I heal primarily 10-man raids and I rarely get WG to hit 5 targets. Maybe it's just bad positioning on my part,
but it just seems more difficult to get the full WG benefit with only 10 raiders. As a consequence, the glyph does not
seem that helpful. I have tried a macro to target the boss before casting, but it does not seem to make a substantial difference. Am I just doing it wrong or is WG really much less effective in 10-mans?


I have specced out of long time ago. Im lucky to even hit 5 targets, so 6 targets is even more rare.

I have taken Nourish and Rapid Rejuvenation along with Swiftmend, because its often we are only 2 healers and I therefor do alot of tank healing.

I tought of Regrowth vs Nourish but Nourish just seem to be better for me (Note:This is personal feeling and some might be able to tell if its right).

#309 teiglin

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 04:31 AM

re: WG glyph in 10mans, I never run it myself. Assuming the usual three ranged, three melee, two tanks, two healers, my usual WG targets the boss, thus hitting the melee and tanks but not ranged since the latter are often spread out. YMMV with exact comp, but I find that the need to heal an extra target with WG is low in 10mans. It's still an incredible glyph for 5x1 situations; it might be worth mentioning in the summary that this is where it shines most.

As for the regrowth glyph, I didn't think it affected the HoT--isn't it only 20% on the initial heal? (apparently it does affect the hot) While it may be useful for heavy regrowth spam situations, I remain dubious as to whether you would be overwriting regrowths frequently even in a heavy raid damage situation. Rejuv still provides a stronger buffer against moderate, continual damage, while nourish is faster, cheaper, and larger on the initial cast when concerned with sudden spikes where the target already has a regrowth ticking (especially with empowered touch).

I'd also like to point out that the swiftmend glyph does increase throughput directly, because casting the swiftmend and reapplying the hot effectively delays your tick by a GCD plus half the tick period of rejuv on average (~2.5 seconds with decent haste and no rapid rejuv, which amounts to slightly less than one tick). I consider it indispensable in any situation where you would be using swiftmend, since the times you're using swiftmend are usually when you can least afford to lose extra rejuv ticks.

As a corollary, I should dispute the claim that the rejuv ticks subsequent to a swiftmend are more likely to be overheal, since I am unlikely to cast swiftmend on someone if I don't expect them to be taking more damage. The first example that pops to mind is rotface's disease--the rejuv is not sufficient to keep the person up through the MS effect, and a swiftmend as they near the kiting tank can heal up much of the intermediate damage while leaving the rejuv on them to mop up the last bit of slime aoe damage as they move back into position--though this applies to a swiftmend in any continual-damage situation. Another common use of swiftmend is on tank spikes, where subsequent ticks are no more or less likely to overheal than any others, given the inherent unpredictability of tank damage.

Great summary of the nourish glyph. I love it for 10mans where I primarily run with a holy priest, and I think it's really under-appreciated, perhaps because of the community's focus on 25mans where you can generally count on a few holy pallies/disc priests.

#310 Rijndael

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 04:53 AM

As for the regrowth glyph, I didn't think it affected the HoT--isn't it only 20% on the initial heal? While it may be useful for heavy regrowth spam situations, I remain dubious as to whether you would be overwriting regrowths frequently even in a heavy raid damage situation. Rejuv still provides a stronger buffer against moderate, continual damage, while nourish is faster, cheaper, and larger on the initial cast when concerned with sudden spikes where the target already has a regrowth ticking (especially with empowered touch).

I'd also like to point out that the swiftmend glyph does increase throughput directly, because casting the swiftmend and reapplying the hot effectively delays your tick by a GCD plus 1.5 times the tick period of rejuv on average (~5.5 seconds with decent haste and no rapid rejuv, which amounts to nearly two ticks). I consider it indispensable in any situation where you would be using swiftmend, since the times you're using swiftmend are usually when you can least afford to lose extra rejuv ticks.

As a corollary, I should dispute the claim that the rejuv ticks subsequent to a swiftmend are more likely to be overheal, since I am unlikely to cast swiftmend on someone if I don't expect them to be taking more damage. The first example that pops to mind is rotface's disease--the rejuv is not sufficient to keep the person up through the MS effect, and a swiftmend as they near the kiting tank can heal up much of the intermediate damage while leaving the rejuv on them to mop up the last bit of slime aoe damage as they move back into position--though this applies to a swiftmend in any continual-damage situation. Another common use of swiftmend is on tank spikes, where subsequent ticks are no more or less likely to overheal than any others, given the inherent unpredictability of tank damage.

Great summary of the nourish glyph. I love it for 10mans where I primarily run with a holy priest, and I think it's really under-appreciated, perhaps because of the community's focus on 25mans where you can generally count on a few holy pallies/disc priests.


Regrowth glyph affects everything. Great points on everything else, I will modify the post.

#311 teiglin

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 09:36 AM

Minor correction to my own math--I overestimated the amount of rejuv time you lose by swiftmending w/o the glyph; you actually only lose on average half a tick's worth of rejuv time plus a GCD. In the best case, you swiftmend immediately after a tick, then one GCD later you reapply rejuv, so you only lost the GCD and not a whole tick; in the worst case, you swiftmend immediately before a tick, meaning you clobber one whole tick but still restart the timer one GCD later, meaning you lost that one whole tick but not more. I'll edit my post above.

#312 Maranora

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 09:05 PM

(Concerning Wild Growth):

I have tried a macro to target the boss before casting, but it does not seem to make a substantial difference.


Does that even work? I would have expected the spell to be centred on myself if I have a hostile target when casting, or fail with "invalid target", depending on whether the "automatic cast on self" option under interface > combat is set (My WoW client isn't english - the exact wording of the option is surely different, but I imagine you know what I mean). However, testing (outside a group on a random hostile mob) just now gave me an "invalid target" even though I have that option set.

Targetting the tank would work though, and has been very succesful for me - but I don't raid much any more, and when I do it's with an excessively melee-heavy group, so my actual results are probably not typical.

Swiftmend.

Prevents Swiftmend from eating a hot when it's cast. This glyph is similar to the lifebloom glyph in the sense that it saves you GCDs since you have to recast less hots. The value of this glyph isn't straightforward to compute -- it essentially saves you whatever healing the remaining hot would have done had it not been eaten by Swiftmend.


I used to be a huge fan of the swiftmend glyph, but lately, given the decent selection of potentially viable glyphs, I've been seriously reconsidering.
One point: If you have the swiftmend glyph, you'll probably be using swiftmend very much more often than if you don't. Without the glyph, nourish becomes a more attractive alternative in many cases, since it also neatly fits in a GCD, costs roughly the same, which of the two heals hits for more depends on a lot of factors (nourish glyph, (talented) crit chances, existing HoTs), and you don't have to recast the HoT (with the influence on tick interval noted by teiglin). Swiftmend is still a very cool spell due to being instant, but without the glyph, it loses a fair bit of its charm.

This makes the value of the glyph even harder to compute than you've already noted, since dropping the glyph will probably mean you're only casting swiftmend when it's instant nature is critical, and deferring to nourish (or something else entirely) normally. This may even be a good thing, since it would leave the swiftmend cooldown available for when it's instant nature suddenly becomes important.

Rapid Rejuvenation.

The new glyph of patch 3.3, this makes haste rating lower the time between rejuvenation ticks (without adding new ticks). This leaves healing per cast time of rejuvenation unchanged while increasing healing per second.


Given the popularity of revitalize, it's probably worth explicitly mentioning that it increases the revitalize effect per second as well.

#313 Lyshkami

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 01:22 AM

(Concerning Wild Growth):
Does that even work? I would have expected the spell to be centred on myself if I have a hostile target when casting, or fail with "invalid target", depending on whether the "automatic cast on self" option under interface > combat is set (My WoW client isn't english - the exact wording of the option is surely different, but I imagine you know what I mean). However, testing (outside a group on a random hostile mob) just now gave me an "invalid target" even though I have that option set.

Wild Growth seems to work in a fairly unique way; It can be centered on friendly or hostile targets. Specifically:

If you do not have a target, or your target is dead, or not attackable, then it will Auto Self Cast if set.

If you have a valid target, friendly or hostile, it will attempt to cast on them. If it is a hostile target, it will heal friendly players within 15 yards of that hostile target, or give "invalid target" if there are no friendly players within 15 yards of the target. It will not Auto Self Cast.

#314 ttyl

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 08:33 PM

Wild Growth seems to work in a fairly unique way; It can be centered on friendly or hostile targets. Specifically:

If you do not have a target, or your target is dead, or not attackable, then it will Auto Self Cast if set.

If you have a valid target, friendly or hostile, it will attempt to cast on them. If it is a hostile target, it will heal friendly players within 15 yards of that hostile target, or give "invalid target" if there are no friendly players within 15 yards of the target. It will not Auto Self Cast.

This is how Circle of Healing works too, except worse. With WG, if the hostile target is farther than 40 yards, WG won't cast. With CoH, it will Auto Self Cast if there are no friendly players within 15 yards of the hostile target and Auto Self Cast if the hostile target is farther than 40 yards. Makes no sense :\

#315 Nefaruis

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 11:01 PM

Rapid Rejuvenation.

The new glyph of patch 3.3, this makes haste rating lower the time between rejuvenation ticks (without adding new ticks). This leaves healing per cast time of rejuvenation unchanged while increasing healing per second. This glyph is similar to the priest glyph of renew in this way. The value of this glyph depends on the damage pattern of the fight. Some fights, such as Twin Valkyrs, have raid wide aura damage which favors Rejuv/Wild Growth spamming. In such fights, what determines druid throughput is healing per cast time, which makes this glyph not particularly useful. On the other hand, some fights feature damage that is more focused on tanks, and specific targets (for instance Rotface's infection, or Saurfang's mark). In such fights druids don't spam as much, and use more targetted healing instead, so healing per second becomes a more important characteristic. In such fights the glyph may be very valuable. Finally on some fights (Anub) you may want to restrict the amount of HPS you do. Such fights also aren't a good time to bring out this glyph. The glyph becomes very powerful in 5 man or 10 man content since it allows druids to blanket the entire group/raid with faster ticking Rejuvenations with little sacrifice of coverage.


I have to disagree with you on this.

First off I have to say that I am seeing 12 second rejuvs at haste cap with the rapid rejuv glyph and I have based this post off of that. This allows me to cover 10 people with rejuv and cast 2 WG before my first rejuv falls

Over a 18 second window with and without the rapid rejuv glyph you will see 96 ticks of rejuv in a sustained situation. In that same 18 second window you will also see a drop of only 5 Targets going from 30 on normal rejuv to 25 on rapid rejuv. Your throughput will suffer 0 fall in glyphing for rapid in aura fights where you use the 5+1 method if you're at haste cap since you are still seeing 96 ticks. What you will see is a drop in personel coverage. If you are like my guild, we run 2 trees 99.9% of the time. What this allows is for both tree to glyph rapid and provide a higher HPS blanket over two assigned groups vs just throwing them out wildly. The 5th uncovered group is our predesignated tank group and thus already has a majority of its members with dedicated healers for the fight.

I am truly having a hard time seeing the argument of loss in effective healing in aura fights with the rapid glyph. All I can see is the raised HPS on the targets you are healing allowing for a greater potential damage cap before the raid starts dieing.

Further more in a nonsustained blanket the rapid rejuv will provide a shorther ramp up time potentially saving those at the end of your cycle.

#316 teiglin

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 12:12 AM

I am truly having a hard time seeing the argument of loss in effective healing in aura fights with the rapid glyph. All I can see is the raised HPS on the targets you are healing allowing for a greater potential damage cap before the raid starts dieing.

Further more in a nonsustained blanket the rapid rejuv will provide a shorther ramp up time potentially saving those at the end of your cycle.


He didn't say you lose effective healing with rapid rejuv, but that it was "not particularly useful" because it doesn't increase the healing done by a single rejuv. The point is that, either way, you expect most of your rejuv to be effective, compared to a fight with less well-distributed damage, where the faster ticks means that you're more likely to get ticks that are effective.

I can see how your healing strategy could work well, but for twins at least, imprecise blanketing is more than sufficient; I've never found that precise healing assignments such as you describe help me much in raid healing (standard caveat of "every raid should do what works best").

The ramp-up time is an interesting argument for some things perhaps, but at least on twins, it's quite easy to have your rejuvs rolling before the pull making that particular line moot.

#317 Rijndael

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 08:29 AM

You actually might lose effective healing from rapid rejuv on aura fights where the aura damage is more dps than a standard rejuv's hps but less than a rapid rejuv's hps (since you will probably increase oveheal glyphing rapid rejuv then). This will become important as druids start to outgear aura fights.

Incidentally -- anyone know of a good way to measure how many targets Wild Growth hits on average per cast in a given fight (trying to find a way to evaluate the Wild Growth glyph)?

#318 Carebare

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 09:19 AM

It really depends where you cast it primarily which is what gives strength or weakness to the glyph. I tend to throw it into melee personally since they benefit from Revitalize and I have a good chance of hitting at least 5 targets. If I see a ranged group that has that many people I will use it there as well. How good that glyph is depends on how good the person casting WG is at putting in a place that will make the most use of it consistently. That's not to say it's wasted on a smaller group (it can still be useful). It just really requires that you look at your screen when you cast it if you're looking to always hit the maximum amount of targets (as opposed to tunneling on grid).

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